Soundscape - sharing the transformational power of sound

About Celia

Celia BeesonI have been working as a sound practitioner since 2006, after training with Don Conreaux and Stefan Cartwright.  I also qualified as a hypnotherapist in 2007, and weave insights and skills from hypnotherapy into the sessions, using guided relaxation and meditation.  More recently I have been studying with Chloe Goodchild, exploring the power of the voice.

I have worked with sound both solo and as part of the ‘Heartwaves’ trio, in many contexts, including the annual Mind Body Spirit Festival in London, Cabot Circus, St Stephens Church, Circomedia and the Colston Hall.

About the Instruments

Singing Bowls

Singing Bowl

Tibetan singing bowls are played by striking with a soft beater or by running a wooden wand around the rim. The bowls produce many notes, and when two or more bowls are played together this creates a beautiful and complex sound.

Gongs

Gong

Gongs are ancient instruments, used in music and ritual for at least a thousand years. The vibrations from the gong are heard and also felt in the body, with frequencies above and below the range of human hearing.

Sruti

Sruti

The sruti box is similar to a harmonium, and plays a single chord as a rich and resonant drone. This can be used alone, or to support the voice or other instruments.

Sansoula

Sansoula

The sansoula is a thumb piano mounted on a resonator – it is tuned so that all the notes make harmonious combinations, so it can be played freely.

Tingshaws

Tingshaws

These are also known as meditation bells, and produce a clear bright note. They are often used at the beginning and end of a meditation practice.

Voice

Voice

In sound therapy the voice can be used with simple sounds like the OM on a changing note, which resonates with the body. Vocal overtoning adds beautiful high harmonic notes.